Silver Sentiments

Learning thru living.

A Koala reflecting on his sins, his triumphs, and the inevitability of death.

(via mikelovehall)

breenewsome:

Handcuff suicides are oddly common… #handsup #dontshoot #policebrutality #ourlivesmatter #ferguson #mikebrown #blacklivesmatter

breenewsome:

Handcuff suicides are oddly common… #handsup #dontshoot #policebrutality #ourlivesmatter #ferguson #mikebrown #blacklivesmatter

(via thesoftghetto)

I will teach my daughter not to wear her skin like a drunken apology. I will tell her ‘make a home out of your body, live in yourself, do not let people turn you into a regret, do not justify yourself.

Azra T. “Your hands are threads, your body is a canvas”

(via yesdarlingido)

(via dabblingwithrj)

jasoniaistheway:

I told my little cousin that her beautiful hair has magical powers… So she bought me back some acorns as a gift lol I love you Aubrey🌻

P. S. Black Girls DO matter.

Lol y’all I got these pine cones mixed up with acorns… My bad lol

(via thesoftghetto)

yungmethuselah:

yungmethuselah:

How come Beyoncé wears crystal-studded leotards, 6” heels and fishnets, but she dresses Blue Ivy, her baby, in regular baby clothes? It really makes you think.

How come Beyoncé chooses to drink alcohol but doesn’t have Blue Ivy drink it? Why is Blue Ivy always being carried around? Why is she so short?

(via yoncehaunted)

rasdivine:

The inventor of the Cellular phone is Henry Sampson, Jr. Sampson is an African-American from Jackson , Mississippi . He attended Morehouse College and transferred to Purdue. He received an MS in Engineering from the
University Of California. He was awarded an MS in Nuclear Engineering from Illinois and his Ph.D from Illinois . Sampson is the first African-American to receive a Ph.D in Nuclear Engineering.In 1971 Sampson was awarded a patent for the “gamma-electric cell.” This technology was used in the cellular phone.
During the AIChE Centennial Meeting held in Philadelphia in November 2008, Dr. Sampson was honored among the “Twenty Chemical Engineers in Other Pursuits.” Sampson is the recipient of a variety of awards including the Atomic Energy Commission Award (1964-1967), Black Image Award from Aerospace Corporation (1982), Blacks in Engineering, Applied Science and Education Award and Los Angeles Council of Black Professional Engineers (1983), and was named a fellow in the U.S. Navy (1962-1964).
In addition to his work in engineering fields, Sampson is a writer, film historian, and documentary film producer who focuses on the African American presence in the film and entertainment industries. He has written five books about the portrayal of African Americans in movies, cartoons, and on radio. Sampson is married to Laura Howzell Young-Sampson, a professor at California State University-San Bernardino. Together, they are working on a biography of Sampson’s mother.
On July 6th, 1971, Henry T. Sampson invented the “gamma-electric cell”, which pertains to Nuclear Reactor use. According to Dr. Sampson, the Gamma Electric Cell, patented July 6, 1971, Patent No. 3,591,860 produces stable high-voltage output and current to detect radiation in the ground.
Born in Jackson, Mississippi, he received a Bachelor of Science degree from Purdue University in 1956. He went on to the University of California, Los Angeles where he graduated with an MS degree in engineering in 1961; University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, MS in Nuclear Engineering in 1965, and a PHD in 1967.
Mobile Communications took a big step forward in 1983 with the invention of the Cellular System regulating the portable telephones, which use radio waves to transmit and receive audio signals. Before this time, mobile telephone service in the United States, consisting mainly of car phones, was extremely limited because metropolitan areas had only one antenna for these purposes. In addition, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigned only 12 to 24 frequencies to each area, which meant that only that many calls could occur at a time.
These limitations often meant a wait of up to 30 minutes for a dial tone and a five to 10 year waiting list just to acquire the service. With the invention of cellular phone service in 1983, personal communications no longer depended on wires. In the 1990s it would become possible to connect to the Internet from virtually anywhere in the world using a portable computer and a cellular modem with satellite service. Technologies that developed from different fields, such as personal communications, computation, and space exploration often worked together to serve the constantly evolving human needs of the information age.
    Henry T. Sampson worked as a research Chemical Engineer at the US Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California. 1956-61. Henry T. Sampson then moved on to the Aerospace Corp, El Segundo, California. His titles include: Project Engineer, 1967-81, director of Planning and Operations Directorate of Space Test Program, 1981-, and Co-inventor of gamma-electric cell.
    He holds patents related to solid rocket motors and conversion of nuclear energy into electricity. He also pioneered a study of internal ballistics of solid rocket motors using high-speed photography.
    He was also a producer of documentary films on early black filmmakers and films, a member of the board of directors of Los Angeles Southwest College Foundation, and a technical consultant to Historical Black Colleges and Universities Program.
    Sampson’s Awards and Honors:
    * Fellow of US Navy, 1962-1964
    * Atomic Energy Commission, 1964-1967
    * Black Image Award from Aerospace Corp, 1982
    * Blacks in Engineering, Applied Science, and Education Award, Los Angeles Council of Black Professional Engineers, 1983

rasdivine:

The inventor of the Cellular phone is Henry Sampson, Jr. Sampson is an African-American from Jackson , Mississippi . He attended Morehouse College and transferred to Purdue. He received an MS in Engineering from the

University Of California. He was awarded an MS in Nuclear Engineering from Illinois and his Ph.D from Illinois . Sampson is the first African-American to receive a Ph.D in Nuclear Engineering.In 1971 Sampson was awarded a patent for the “gamma-electric cell.” This technology was used in the cellular phone.

During the AIChE Centennial Meeting held in Philadelphia in November 2008, Dr. Sampson was honored among the “Twenty Chemical Engineers in Other Pursuits.” Sampson is the recipient of a variety of awards including the Atomic Energy Commission Award (1964-1967), Black Image Award from Aerospace Corporation (1982), Blacks in Engineering, Applied Science and Education Award and Los Angeles Council of Black Professional Engineers (1983), and was named a fellow in the U.S. Navy (1962-1964).

In addition to his work in engineering fields, Sampson is a writer, film historian, and documentary film producer who focuses on the African American presence in the film and entertainment industries. He has written five books about the portrayal of African Americans in movies, cartoons, and on radio. Sampson is married to Laura Howzell Young-Sampson, a professor at California State University-San Bernardino. Together, they are working on a biography of Sampson’s mother.

On July 6th, 1971, Henry T. Sampson invented the “gamma-electric cell”, which pertains to Nuclear Reactor use. According to Dr. Sampson, the Gamma Electric Cell, patented July 6, 1971, Patent No. 3,591,860 produces stable high-voltage output and current to detect radiation in the ground.

Born in Jackson, Mississippi, he received a Bachelor of Science degree from Purdue University in 1956. He went on to the University of California, Los Angeles where he graduated with an MS degree in engineering in 1961; University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, MS in Nuclear Engineering in 1965, and a PHD in 1967.

Mobile Communications took a big step forward in 1983 with the invention of the Cellular System regulating the portable telephones, which use radio waves to transmit and receive audio signals. Before this time, mobile telephone service in the United States, consisting mainly of car phones, was extremely limited because metropolitan areas had only one antenna for these purposes. In addition, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigned only 12 to 24 frequencies to each area, which meant that only that many calls could occur at a time.

These limitations often meant a wait of up to 30 minutes for a dial tone and a five to 10 year waiting list just to acquire the service. With the invention of cellular phone service in 1983, personal communications no longer depended on wires. In the 1990s it would become possible to connect to the Internet from virtually anywhere in the world using a portable computer and a cellular modem with satellite service. Technologies that developed from different fields, such as personal communications, computation, and space exploration often worked together to serve the constantly evolving human needs of the information age.

    Henry T. Sampson worked as a research Chemical Engineer at the US Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California. 1956-61. Henry T. Sampson then moved on to the Aerospace Corp, El Segundo, California. His titles include: Project Engineer, 1967-81, director of Planning and Operations Directorate of Space Test Program, 1981-, and Co-inventor of gamma-electric cell.

    He holds patents related to solid rocket motors and conversion of nuclear energy into electricity. He also pioneered a study of internal ballistics of solid rocket motors using high-speed photography.

    He was also a producer of documentary films on early black filmmakers and films, a member of the board of directors of Los Angeles Southwest College Foundation, and a technical consultant to Historical Black Colleges and Universities Program.

    Sampson’s Awards and Honors:

    * Fellow of US Navy, 1962-1964

    * Atomic Energy Commission, 1964-1967

    * Black Image Award from Aerospace Corp, 1982

    * Blacks in Engineering, Applied Science, and Education Award, Los Angeles Council of Black Professional Engineers, 1983

(Source: reunionblackfamily.com, via thesoftghetto)

dailydishonesty:

Daily Dishonesty Giveaway Post #1! Reblog for a chance to win your very own copy of the Daily Dishonesty book!
To Enter: Reblog a Daily Dishonesty Giveaway post from 8/26 to 9/1 from dailydishonesty.com for a chance to win the book. You may reblog each post for up to seven chances. Giveaway open to U.S. residents only. Giveaway ends September 1st, 2014 11:59 PM EST. Limit one book per winner. One winner per post will be chosen at random for a total of seven winners.

dailydishonesty:

Daily Dishonesty Giveaway Post #1! Reblog for a chance to win your very own copy of the Daily Dishonesty book!

To Enter: Reblog a Daily Dishonesty Giveaway post from 8/26 to 9/1 from dailydishonesty.com for a chance to win the book. You may reblog each post for up to seven chances. Giveaway open to U.S. residents only. Giveaway ends September 1st, 2014 11:59 PM EST. Limit one book per winner. One winner per post will be chosen at random for a total of seven winners.

My name is not Annie. It’s Quvenzhané.

Quvenzhané Wallis (then age 9) correcting an AP Reporter who said she was “just going to call her Annie” instead of learning how to pronounce her name. Never forget.  (via thechanelmuse)

(via thesoftghetto)